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Fear over MMR vaccine could lead to measles resurgence

The epidemic in Ireland is directly linked to parents boycotting the triple MMR vaccine

Dr Mary Ramsay, consultant immunologist at the Public Health Laboratory Service, has gone on record as saying, ‘It’s a myth that measles is not serious. One in 5,000 can get a fatal complication.’

Two children have died – and anything up to a further 100 are currently in hospital – following an outbreak of measles in Dublin (2009).

 

The mini epidemic in Ireland is directly linked to parents boycotting the triple MMR vaccine in light of the furore currently raging over co-called side effects such as inflammatory bowel disease and autism being reported in the press. We are on the verge of seeing the same picture across the UK, where the press is reporting that low immunisation rates have resulted in 1220 recent cases of measles being diagnoses – the highest for seven years.

 

Health professionals are at pains to reassure the public that there is no hard and fast evidence to prove the connection between the vaccine and these side effects and are urging parents not to panic – nor to cling to the misplaced belief that measles is a ‘normal’ childhood illness that does not pose any threat to health. Dr Mary Ramsay, consultant immunologist at the Public Health Laboratory Service, has gone on record as saying, ‘It’s a myth that measles is not serious. One in 5,000 can get a fatal complication.’

 

Since the MMR vaccine was introduced into Britain since 1988, following strenuous testing, measles has virtually been wiped out.

In the 60s the illness caused in the region of 100 deaths per annum. Since the introduction of the vaccine, death rates have apparently dropped to virtually zero – whereas the rate of autism remains the same in those who have been vaccinated as in those who have not.

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